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20121202
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the obama administration done enough on climate change and what do you want them to do in the next four years? >> i'm going to be candid with you, none of us have done enough. my comments about climate challenge was about some of what the governors are doing in the northeast and what we're doing along the coast of california and washington state that don't necessarily have oil and fossil fuel resources. >> i'm going to jump in because we're going we're having a little bit of a signal problem. it was breaking up so we apologize for that. let me go back to your point about environmental issues and global warming because you point out it was a huge issue in the campaign, something the president promised to do more. >> we haven't seen a lot of action in the first four years but i feel like there is a couple of issues on the wish list, if you will, that i feel like the obama administration hasn't engaged on. whether it is gun control or immigration reform, we haven't seen a serious immigration reform proposal with the examination of the dream act. there are these issues that the administrati
recorded in the obama administration. not twice as large than the largest deficit in american history. not three times as large as the largest deficit in american history. but almost four times larger than the previous largest annual deficit in american history was the first year deficit recorded in the obama administration. we tip, that was the first time ever we run trillion dollar deficits, we continue to run trillion dollar deficits throughout that time. tax policy hasn't changed during that time. tax policy is exactly the same. you hear in the newspaper all the time, mr. speaker, the bush tax cuts. i don't know that that has meaning anymore. in 2001 and 2003 we did do some dramatic changes to tax policy. president obama extended all of those changes in 2010. that's the law of the land still today. tax policy has been exactly the same over this continuum. what has changed, mr. speaker, what has changed is the spending. the reason deficits have grown not one, not two, not three but almost four times larger than the previous record deficit in american history is not because tax poli
during the end of that administration. we'll likely see an impulse for the same with the obama administration and iran. and that means congress will have to push very hard to see that human rights and democracy and the promotion of those principles in iran is and that agenda foremost on that agenda and with the help of f.d.d., we'll do that. and to that very issue, congratulations on your human rights panel this morning. congratulations on all you do and one more time i want to tell you, the intellectual information, the data that you provide is absolutely essential. i thank you for that. and i think at that point, we'll take some questions, won't we? thank you, toby. [applause] >> congressman royce. it is clear to all of us why you have been entrusted with the very important gavel of chairing the house foreign affairs committee following the able leadership of chairman laint. we are on a tighter schedule and i'm going to call up senator casey but i recognize the presence here today of lieutenant colonel larry ger lock. he was the commander of an amphibious unit. he drove two t
to be even more repressive. likewise, the obama administration, with the president's reelection, faces an interesting set of questions about how best to continue on the strategy of trying to prevent the iranian nuclear program from arriving at the point where they are able to produce a weapon. and how you tighten anti- proliferation policy with a human rights policy is an issue that is often -- has often been difficult for policy-makers to reconcile. why don't i quickly opened it up? maybe i will start with marina since your experience is so personal and maybe ask you, and a basic level, whether you think life for ordinary iranians has gotten better or worse in the last few years. give us your best sense of what the human rights landscape looks like today verses say five years ago or a decade ago. >> i guess this all depends on how much people know hear about the absolute disregard for human rights in iran. i don't know how much you know about it in 1979, when the revolution succeeded, we had hoped that the promise of freedom and democracy, we had hoped iran would become a democracy bu
years the obama administration, in really a bipartisan spirit, has sought to step up our game in the asia-pacific region, to increase our diplomatic, our commercial, our strategic and our political interactions really across the board. and when we think about it -- it's been termed either the pivot or rebalancing -- a key component of that is frankly our desire to improve and increase our interactions and our relationship with china. we all recognize its importance on the global stage. and frankly, the region and the world demands that the united states and china make an extraordinary effort to make sure that our relationship is strong and stable and predictable. you referred to this long history of what are often referred to as hegemonic transitions. one of the things i would say is that the leadership on both sides has the benefit of that history, to look at missteps that have been taken in the past. and there is a very clear determination on both sides to ensure that where we compete, we compete peacefully and that we seek always to step up areas of cooperation as we go for
by the bush administration first, and then, of course, were increased by the obama administration. it's important to recognize that the eslc report is not political in any way, shape or form. it endorses things that are heartily supported by the right , in some cases, and on the other hand that are supported by people on the left. it's important to recognize you can't just take the parts that you like. you have to take the wholistic approach, which is to, again, maximize u.s. production and to at the same time significantly reduce consumption partly by diversifying our transportation sector away from petroleum. now, the last thing i'll say before we sit down is it's important to recognize that petroleum use in transportation is the pivot point of this entire problem. about 70% of our 18.7 million barrel per day use of petroleum in this country is for transportation, and transportation is fueled about 93% of the time by petroleum. so if you want to reduce the united states' dependence on imported petroleum and the related geopolitical issues that that causes, particularly in an era whe
obama talks about tax policy. there were put employers by the previous >> project administration and will expire at the end of the year. then marker rubio gives the address. >> hello, everybody. over the last few weeks, there's been a lot of talk about deadlines we're facing on jobs and taxes and investments. but with so much noise and so many opinions flying around, it can be easy to lose sight of what this debate is really about. it's not about which political party comes out on top, or who wins or loses in washington. it's about making smart decisions that will have a real impact on your lives and the lives of americans all across the country. right now, middle-class tax cuts are set to expire at the end of the year. time is running out. and there are two things that can happen. first, if congress does nothing, every family in america will see their income taxes automatically go up on january 1st. a typical middle-class family of four would get a $2,200 tax hike. that would be bad for families, it would be bad for businesses, and it would drag down our entire economy. now, con
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7